POST: On the Town. What's NYC like on stage?

 Megan Fairchild and the cast of  On The Town , photo by Joan Marcus

Megan Fairchild and the cast of On The Town, photo by Joan Marcus

On January 17, I saw On the Town with my mother.

The first thing I noticed when we walked into the theatre was the huge American flag in the center of the stage. Then, the performance started like no other show I had ever seen, with our National Anthem but there was no one on stage. Everyone, including myself, stood up and most of the audience started singing along. Suddenly, someone in the back of the theatre began to sing in a beautiful operatic voice. We all stopped singing and turned around to get a glimpse. I could faintly see through all the audience members that the singer was walking slowly up the aisle. Once he reached the stage, the play began with its own number "I Feel Like Im Not Out of Bed Yet".

 Clyde Alves, Tony Yazbeck, Jay Armstrong Johnson and cast of  On The Town,  photo by Joan Marcus

Clyde Alves, Tony Yazbeck, Jay Armstrong Johnson and cast of On The Town, photo by Joan Marcus

 Megan Fairchild and Jackie Hoffman, photo by Joan Marcus

Megan Fairchild and Jackie Hoffman, photo by Joan Marcus

As I'm writing this, I'm still humming the tune of "New York, New York! It's a helluva town!"

Every part of that scene, three sailor boys in their first visit to NY, I could feel the excitement.  It reminded me of why I love living in the Big Apple for its "Sights! Lights! Nights!". The show  was so funny; like when Ivy's singing instructor, Madame Dilly, couldn't hit half the notes in "Do Do Re Do". Throughout the show, there was another audience member that would laugh really loudly behind me. I felt rather amused by his laugh because it reminded me of the people that would laugh in the background of TV shows.

I was completely mesmerized by the grace and elegance of the way the character Ivy, Megan Fairchild, danced. This was the first broadway show I had seen with ballet incorporated and she left a lasting impression. Why don't more shows should use ballet?

 Jay Armstrong Johnson and Alysha Umphress, photo by Joan Marcus

Jay Armstrong Johnson and Alysha Umphress, photo by Joan Marcus

I enjoyed how the show pulled off bringing New York City to life on stage.

I loved how the projector showed a moving train when the characters were riding the subway and how the characters almost fell on top of each other whenever the subway came to a stop. To be honest, I have stopped counting the number of times that has happened to me. During the scene where Chip takes his first trip in a yellow taxi, a simulator chair moved with the motion of the crazy driver. I always dread taxi rides because I usually get the same type of driver. Oh, how could I forget the unfriendly New Yorkers? Gabey couldn't get anyone on the street to give him any directions because no one was willing to stop. Yep, that sounds just about right in the big city.

The scenes of Coney Island in the 1940's were so cool. 

I have spent so many summers at the beach and amusement park there. Coney Island has transformed so much, no more magic show or dancing shows. However, I still believe that Coney Island was and still is a place for people to escape their daily problems. 

In the show, Gabey was running around New York City for 24 hours trying to find love. It made me realize that some things like human nature for love just don't and shouldn't change. It was very emotional when the three sailor boys had to return to the Navy and say goodbye to all they had found: love and adventure.