POST: Pretty Filthy. Are we too quick to condemn porn stars?

 Maria-Christina Oliveras, Alyse Alan Louis, Jared Zirilli (background), John Behlmann, and Lulu Fall. Photo by Richard Termine

Maria-Christina Oliveras, Alyse Alan Louis, Jared Zirilli (background), John Behlmann, and Lulu Fall. Photo by Richard Termine

As often as I drift into conversation with myself, I seldom find myself pondering the origins of the few adult film actors that I can name.  Thus, my draw to Pretty Filthy did not come from a curiosity derived from its plot, but rather from my perversion with porn.  So here I am sitting in a small intimate theatre that made me feel as if I was sitting in a private viewing room at some shady 8th avenue brothel.  That said, what a surprise it was when instead of some foreign snuff film, I see art formed around the transformation of the stars who bring joy to households all around America.

 Alyse Alan Louis and John Behlmann. Photo by Richard Termine.

Alyse Alan Louis and John Behlmann. Photo by Richard Termine.

"Ron Jeremy should be a friend of mine", I think as I see actors sing about threesomes, milfs and gangbangs.  I can hear him name dropping and running off his credentials as if his career didn't get to the point where he had to participate in The Surreal Life just to get 10 more years of name recognition.  Yet, as the musical so clearly prophesizes, sex is forever in, but the age of paid porn is out, so sorry Ron, but certain things just can't be lifted after they drop.  Something that Pretty Filthy didn't drop, was the ball.  All in all I find myself satisfied as a young couple from middle America go through the life cycle of porn artists.  The couple begin as amateur artists, to porn star couple, to two separate entities both taking it up the rear (at least she can't say he doesn't know how it feels), to desperate webcam "fairy godmothers" who have given up on trying to break the internet  (that's so Kim K) and now only desire to fulfill their admirer's wishes.  They are merely seeking to be appreciated.

 Alyse Alan Louis. Photo by Richard Termine

Alyse Alan Louis. Photo by Richard Termine

Although a comedic piece, I can see a deeper story in Pretty Filthy.  All around the world people watch pornography, myself included, yet we stigmatize it.  Why is it that we find it permissible to indulge in viewing, yet in the presence of "those who matter" we are quick to condemn those who help satisfy our fantasies?  I can recall being a younger man asking my parents what would they think if I ever became a porn star and my father told me whatever aspiration I held In life he would love me, but he then asked why I would want to be a porn star.  Virginal, but feeling pretty knowledgeable about the world, my answer was that I had always been told sex is supposed to be euphoric and if I could get paid for that, why not?  Then I remember him telling me I have too much brain power for that, there's no thinking that's involved in having sex.  For years I agreed with him, but now I've put thought into it, and I believe a lot of brain power is needed.  As a porn start one must be knowledgeable of the ways in creating a perfect visual for their target audience all the while dealing with the stress of knowing multiple people will see there bodies, will be their fans, and will encounter them while trying to lead normal lives.  With that in mind, being a porn star is one of the hardest jobs out there. 

So I leave you with this food for thought... 
Is on-screen nudity not a beautification of the human form and a promoter for positive self-image? 
Should porn stars be condemned or should society recognize pornography as an art form (often indulged in)?