POST: 'Airline Highway' Family is much more than people who share the same blood.

 Photo by Joan Marcus

Photo by Joan Marcus

A woman named Krista sits at the parking lot of The Hummingbird Motel. Krista is a stripper, she just finished her shift at the local gentleman's club. Krista is working to pay for her stay at the motel, a place that she calls home. Soon after, a drunk hippie guy, a man dressed in woman's clothing, and a prostitute who seems to be in her 50's, are introduced.

What's most apparent is the way they talk to each other. It shows that a bond has formed from their years of living with each other, each occupying a room at the motel for some time. They are in no way related, they differ in background and age, each trying to get past their difficult upbringings and tough circumstances. However, put together the members of The Hummingbird Motel's ragtag community and it resembles an ordinary family.

 Photo by Joan Marcus

Photo by Joan Marcus

Krista, the misguided but thoughtful daughter. 
Bait Boy, the reckless/tough/wild brother, busy developing into a man but partying along the way. 
Sissy Nana, the older, been-there-done-that wiser sister.
Wayne, the uncle who won't quit talking about his glory days (and is just kind of weird).
Tanya, the caring aunt, making sure her nephews and nieces are taken care of. 
Terry, the handyman who begged the motel owner for work. He resembled an uncle, a man who provided the family with timely wise words and knew how to solve problems, and also fix things.
And finally, Miss Ruby, the mother to all.

 Photo by Joan Marcus

Photo by Joan Marcus

They were all responsible for paying for their stay to the motel owner, Francis, a man who resembled a landlord, nagging the residents to pay rent but understanding at the same time, often granting favors. 

 A collection of people who are often labeled misfits, they formed a community that genuinely cares about each other. They all brought along some troubling baggage. Almost all of them were abandoned or ran away from their families, but they turned to each other for support. Even though their stories were different, they all shared the disturbing truth, that they are society's forgotten ones. They eased each other's pain and made each other feel accepted. In some instances, I felt that their community played "happy family" even better than some families. Seeing people who suffered from lives of turmoil band together reminded me that family is much more than people who share the same blood. 


 

$27 Student Rush
$30 30 Under 30 tickets

Airline Highway
Samuel J. Friedman Theatre
thru June 7

Victor LopezComment