POST: 'C.S. Lewis' The Great Divorce' - waiting for the bus to Heaven

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What's it about?

Not about a divorce, as I thought it would be, but about the paradox of Heaven and Hell. It begins with a introduction to who I believed was C.S. Lewis. He fell into a deep sleep - jump to a bus stop in a dark, gloomy town.  I soon found out it was actually Hell. There weren't any people in the town except those that stood at the bus stop. Apparently, they were waiting for the bus to Heaven. When they all finally get there - Heaven was unbearable and they despise it.      


What'd I experience?

  The images in the play when they got to Heaven where also like this, very delightful.    Too bad they couldn't enjoy what Heaven had to offer - because when they got to Heaven they became spirits until they totally surrendered and became selfless. Once they solidified, then they could partake like the angels (some, in their previous lives, were murders, liars, even philosophical writers).   

The images in the play when they got to Heaven where also like this, very delightful.
Too bad they couldn't enjoy what Heaven had to offer - because when they got to Heaven they became spirits until they totally surrendered and became selfless. Once they solidified, then they could partake like the angels (some, in their previous lives, were murders, liars, even philosophical writers).   

What a way to end the day, a final exam in the afternoon then a play to finish the evening. I must say on my way on the train I was tired, but C.S. Lewis's name kept echoing in my mind. Having read and seen the Narnia series, he had became one of my favorite writers.

The play was nothing I was expected. It had me thinking about what demons I am fighting. The interesting part about this play, is that every time I had a feeling of - that's so deep, I really have to think about that some more -there is then a moment that explains it more. It was like the play was speaking to me.

One particular moment was the mother who loved her son so much that she began worshiping him. The nurturing, caring love turned into something destructive to her son, even those around her. The worst part about it is that she couldn't see it. She would have rather taken her son to Hell, if it means she can be with him - not thinking about his safety and care. Is that how I am in circumstances - cold, harsh, thoughtless, so fill with hatred - blind?

It's a rhetorical question, of course, but that is what the Bible tells us - that our sins, they blind us. What am I doing mindlessly that is causing me to miss my present moment and miss an opportunity to experience Heaven? What a great Christmas gift this show would be for some of my relatives and my pastors! 

I am glad I saw it - now, I feel like I have a better approach to the situation I am faced with at work with a particular person, because now I understand that hell is a state of mind while Heaven is not. Rather, Heaven is what is real, the present, if you can see. Heaven is reality, not being consumed by ourselves but being consumed by the greater being. 

At the end of the play, this was me. A changed woman!!


 

Want to see it?

$30 General Rush

C.S. Lewis’ The Great Divorce
Fellowship for the Performing Arts
@ the Pearl Theatre
thru Jan. 3